1846, Austria, Emperor Ferdinand I. Silver 5 Kreuzer Coin. Top Pop! PCGS MS-64

1846_Austria_Emperor_Ferdinand_I_Silver_5_Kreuzer_Coin_Top_Pop_PCGS_MS_64_01_lqj 1846, Austria, Emperor Ferdinand I. Silver 5 Kreuzer Coin. Top Pop! PCGS MS-64
1846, Austria, Emperor Ferdinand I. Silver 5 Kreuzer Coin. Top Pop! PCGS MS-64
1846, Austria, Emperor Ferdinand I. Silver 5 Kreuzer Coin. Top Pop! PCGS MS-64

1846, Austria, Emperor Ferdinand I. Silver 5 Kreuzer Coin. Top Pop! PCGS MS-64
1846, Austria, Emperor Ferdinand I. Silver 5 Kreuzer Coin. Mint Year: 1846 Reference: KM-2196. Mint Place: Vienna (A) Denomination: 5 Kreuzer. Certified and graded by PCGS as MS-64! – None higher and none equal! 438 Diameter: 20mm Weight: 2.1gm. Obverse : Laureate head of Ferdinand right. Mint initial (A) below. Reverse : Imperial double headed weagle with coat of arms at chest and crown above. Ferdinand I, Emperor of Austria, King of Hungary and Bohemia (April 19, 1793 – June 29, 1875) succeeded his father (Franz II Holy Roman Emperor/Franz I of Austria) as emperor and king (as Ferdinand V) in 1835. He chose to abdicate, after a series of revolts in 1848. He was also King of Lombardy-Venetia. Ferdinand has been depicted as feeble-minded and incapable of ruling, but although he was epileptic and certainly not intelligent, he kept a coherent and legible diary and has even been said to have a sharp wit. The up to twenty seizures he had per day, though, severely restricted his ability to rule with any effectiveness. Though he was not declared incapacitated, a regent’s council (Archduke Luis, Count Kolowrat and Prince Metternich) steered the government. He is famous for his one coherent command: when his cook told him he could not have apricot dumplings because they were out of season, he said: ââ, ¬Å. I’m the Emperor, and I want dumplings! As the revolutionaries of 1848 were marching on the palace, he is supposed to have asked Metternich for an explanation. When Metternich answered that they were making a revolution, Ferdinand is supposed to have said But are they allowed to do that? Ja, duerfen’s denn des? He was convinced by Felix zu Schwarzenberg to abdicate in favour of his nephew, Franz Joseph (the next in line was Ferdinand’s younger brother Franz Karl, but he was persuaded to waive his succession rights in favour of his son) who would occupy the Austrian throne for the next sixty-eight years. Ferdinand recorded the events in his diary : The affair ended with the new Emperor kneeling before his old Emperor and Lord, that is to say, me, and asking for a blessing, which I gave him, laying both hands on his head and making the sign of the Holy Cross… Then I embraced him and kissed our new master, and then we went to our room. Afterward I and my dear wife heard Holy Mass… After that I and my dear wife packed our bags. Ferdinand was the last King of Bohemia to be crowned as such. Due to his sympathy with Bohemia (where he spent the rest of his life in Prague Castle) he was given the Czech nickname. Ferdinand V, the Good. In Austria, Ferdinand was similarly nicknamed (Ferdinand the Benign), but also ridiculed as (Goodinand the Finished). He is interred in tomb number 62 in the Imperial Crypt in Vienna. This item is in the category “Coins & Paper Money\Coins: World\Europe\Austria”. The seller is “coinworldtv” and is located in this country: AT. This item can be shipped worldwide.
  • Country/Region of Manufacture: Austria
  • Fineness: 0.438
  • Certification: PCGS
  • Grade: MS 64
  • Year: 1846
  • Composition: Silver
  • Denomination: 5 Kreuzer
  • KM Number: 2196

1846, Austria, Emperor Ferdinand I. Silver 5 Kreuzer Coin. Top Pop! PCGS MS-64

1965, Austria. Gold State Treaty Decennial Medal. (4.5gm!) Top Pop! PCGS SP67

1965_Austria_Gold_State_Treaty_Decennial_Medal_4_5gm_Top_Pop_PCGS_SP67_01_pp 1965, Austria. Gold State Treaty Decennial Medal. (4.5gm!) Top Pop! PCGS SP67
1965, Austria. Gold State Treaty Decennial Medal. (4.5gm!) Top Pop! PCGS SP67
1965, Austria. Gold State Treaty Decennial Medal. (4.5gm!) Top Pop! PCGS SP67

1965, Austria. Gold State Treaty Decennial Medal. (4.5gm!) Top Pop! PCGS SP67
Gold “State Treaty Decennial” Medal. Mint Year: 1965 Mint Place: Vienna (A) Medallist/Engraver: Welz Reference: Friedberg -, KM. Denomination: Medal (1½ Ducats) Condition. Certified and graded by PCGS as SP-67! The slab says Germany, which is of course wrong as we can clearly see the Vienna mint mark”(A)” on the medal! Weight: 4.5gm (1½ Ducat) Material: Gold. Obverse: Bird-eye view of the Belvedere Palace with the heraldic single-headed eagle of the Republic of Austria (with sickle and hammer in claws, which are bound by broken chains). Mint mark (A) and purity marking (986) to left, medallist´s signature (WELZ) to right. Legend: 1955 BELVEDERE 1956. Ten years Austrian State Treaty. Reverse: A page of the Austrian State Treaty, which shows four wax seals and signatures of John Foster Dulles (American diplomat, lawyer, and Republican Party politician), Llewellyn E. (American diplomat), Roger Lalouette (Deputy High Commissioner for Austria), Antoine Pinay (Foreign Minister of France) and Leopold Figl Austrian politician of the Austrian People’s Party (Christian Democrats) and the first Federal Chancellor after World War II. Legend: (striped shield) FRIEDE (striped shield) NEUTRALITÄT (striped shield) FREIHEIT Translated. The Belvedere is a historic building complex in Vienna, Austria, consisting of two Baroque palaces (the Upper and Lower Belvedere), the Orangery, and the Palace Stables. The buildings are set in a Baroque park landscape in the third district of the city, on the south-eastern edge of its centre. It houses the Belvedere museum. The grounds are set on a gentle gradient and include decorative tiered fountains and cascades, Baroque sculptures, and majestic wrought iron gates. The Baroque palace complex was built as a summer residence for Prince Eugene of Savoy. The Belvedere was built during a period of extensive construction in Vienna, which at the time was both the imperial capital and home to the ruling Habsburg dynasty. This period of prosperity followed on from the commander-in-chief Prince Eugene of Savoy’s successful conclusion of a series of wars against the Ottoman Empire. The Austrian State Treaty German. Or Austrian Independence Treaty re-established Austria as a sovereign state. It was signed on 15 May 1955 in Vienna, at the Schloss Belvedere among the Allied occupying powers (France, the United Kingdom, the United States, and the Soviet Union) and the Austrian government. The neighbouring Federal People’s Republic of Yugoslavia acceded to the treaty subsequently. It officially came into force on 27 July 1955. Its full title is “Treaty for the re-establishment of an independent and democratic Austria, signed in Vienna on 15 May 1955″ German. The treaty re-established a free, sovereign and democratic Austria. The basis for the treaty was the Moscow Declaration of 30 October 1943. This item is in the category “Coins & Paper Money\Coins: World\Gold”. The seller is “coinworldtv” and is located in this country: AT. This item can be shipped worldwide.
  • Composition: Gold
  • Country/Region of Manufacture: Austria
  • Certification: PCGS
  • KM Number: See detailed description section for full data!
  • Year: 1965

1965, Austria. Gold State Treaty Decennial Medal. (4.5gm!) Top Pop! PCGS SP67

1976, Austria. Gold 1000 Schilling Babenberg Dynasty Coin. Top Pop! PCGS MS69

1976_Austria_Gold_1000_Schilling_Babenberg_Dynasty_Coin_Top_Pop_PCGS_MS69_01_hsl 1976, Austria. Gold 1000 Schilling Babenberg Dynasty Coin. Top Pop! PCGS MS69
1976, Austria. Gold 1000 Schilling Babenberg Dynasty Coin. Top Pop! PCGS MS69
1976, Austria. Gold 1000 Schilling Babenberg Dynasty Coin. Top Pop! PCGS MS69

1976, Austria. Gold 1000 Schilling Babenberg Dynasty Coin. Top Pop! PCGS MS69
Gold 1000 Schilling “Babenberg Dynasty” Coin. Mint Year: 1976 Mint Place: Vienna Reference: KM-2933. Certified and graded by PCGS as MS-69! None higher or equal at PCGS! Denomination: 1000 Schilling – 1000 Years of the Babenberg Babenberg Dynasty Millenium Material: Gold. 900 Weight: 13.48gm Diameter: 27mm. Babenberg was a noble dynasty of Austrian margraves and dukes. Originally from Bamberg in the Duchy of Franconia (present-day Bavaria), the Babenbergs ruled the Imperial Margraviate of Austria from its creation in 976 AD until its elevation to a duchy in 1156, and from then until the extinction of the line in 1246, whereafter they were succeeded by the House of Habsburg. In 962 the Bavarian count Leopold I. , possibly a descendant of the Luitpolding duke Arnulf of Bavaria, was first mentioned as a faithful follower of Emperor Otto I. He remained a loyal supporter of Otto’s son and successor Otto II and in 976 appears as count of the Bavarian Eastern March, then a district not more than 60 miles in breadth on the eastern frontier of the duchy, which grew into the Margraviate of Austria. Leopold, who received the territory as a reward for his fidelity to Emperor Otto II during the uprising of Duke Henry II of Bavaria, extended its area down the Danube river into what is today Lower Austria at the expense of the retreating Magyars. Leopold was succeeded in 994 by his son Henry I, who continued his father’s policy, was followed in 1018 by his brother Adalbert, whose marked loyalty to Emperor Henry II and his Salian successor Henry III was rewarded by many tokens of favour. Adalbert expanded the Austrian territory up to the present borders on the Leitha, March and Thaya rivers. He was succeeded in 1055 by his nephew, Ernest. Leopold II, margrave from 1075, quarrelled with Emperor Henry IV during the Investiture Controversy, when he supported the papal side of Bishop Altmann of Passau. Though Leopold had to cope with the invading troops of Duke Vratislaus II of Bohemia and was defeated at the 1082 Battle of Mailberg, the emperor was unable to oust him from his march or to prevent the succession of his son Leopold III in 1096. Leopold III supported Henry V, the son of Emperor Henry IV, in his rising against his father, but was soon drawn over to the emperor’s side. In 1106 he married the daughter of Henry IV, Agnes, widow of Duke Frederick I of Swabia. In 1125 he declined the royal crown in favour of Lothair of Supplinburg. His zeal in founding monasteries, such as Klosterneuburg Monastery, earned for him his surname “the Pious”, and canonization by Pope Innocent VIII in 1485. He is regarded as the patron saint of Lower and Upper Austria. One of Leopold’s younger sons was Bishop Otto of Freising. His eldest son Leopold IV became margrave in 1136, and in 1139 received the Duchy of Bavaria from the hands of King Conrad III, who had banned the Welf duke Henry the Proud. Leopold’s brother Henry Jasomirgott allegedly named after his favourite oath, So help me God! Was made Count Palatine of the Rhine in 1140, and became Margrave of Austria on Leopold’s death in 1141. Having married Gertrude, the widow of Henry the Proud, he was invested in 1143 with the Duchy of Bavaria, and resigned his office as count palatine. In 1147 he participated in the Second Crusade, and after his return, renounced Bavaria at the instance of the new king Frederick Barbarossa who gave the duchy of Bavaria to Henry the Proud’s son, Duke Henry the Lion of Saxony. As compensation for this, Austria, the capital of which had been transferred to Vienna about 1155, was elevated into a duchy according to the. The second duke was Henry’s son Leopold V, who succeeded him in 1177 and took part in the crusades of 1182 and 1190. In Palestine he quarrelled with Richard I of England, captured him on his homeward journey and handed him over to the emperor Henry VI. Leopold increased the territories of the Babenbergs by acquiring the Duchy of Styria under the will of his kinsman Duke Ottokar IV. He died in 1194, and Austria fell to one son, Frederick, and Styria to another, Leopold; but on Frederick’s death in 1198 they were again united by Leopold as Duke Leopold VI, surnamed “the Glorious”. The new duke fought against the infidels in Spain, Egypt, and Palestine, but is more celebrated as a lawgiver, a patron of letters, and a founder of towns. Under him Vienna became the centre of culture in Germany and the great school of Minnesingers. His later years were spent in strife with his son Frederick, and he died in 1230 at San Germano, now renamed Cassino, whither he had gone to arrange the peace between Emperor Frederick II and Pope Gregory IX. Frederick II, Leopold VI’s son by Theodora Angelina, succeeded his father as duke upon the elder man’s death in 1230. Frederick II soon earned the epithet “the Quarrelsome” from his ongoing disputes with the kings of Hungary and Bohemia and with Holy Roman Emperor Frederick II. Duke Frederick deprived his mother and sisters of their possessions, was hated by his subjects on account of his oppressive rule, and, in 1236, was placed under the imperial ban and driven from Austria. However, he was later restored to his duchy when Emperor Frederick II was excommunicated. Subsequently, Duke Frederick II treated with Emperor Frederick II in vain to make Austria a kingdom. The male line of the Babenbergs became extinct in 1246, when Frederick II was killed in battle (the Henneberg branch of the Franconian Babenbergs lived on until 1583 when its lands were divided among the two branches of the Wettin family). Frederick’s heir general was Gertrude of Austria, the only child of his late elder brother, Henry of Austria by that man’s wife, Agnes of Thuringia. However, neither her husbands nor her son succeeded in settling the Babenberg inheritance under their power. Gertrude’s only surviving child, Agnes of Baden, tried to reclaim at least part of her inheritence through her third husband Ulrich II of Heunburg, but was unsuccessful. After some years of struggle known as the. The Duchies of Austria and Styria fell to Ottokar II of Bohemia, and subsequently to Rudolph I of Habsburg, whose descendants were to rule Austria until 1918. This item is in the category “Coins & Paper Money\Coins: World\Gold”. The seller is “coinworldtv” and is located in this country: AT. This item can be shipped worldwide.
  • Composition: Gold
  • Country/Region of Manufacture: Austria
  • Certification: PCGS
  • KM Number: 2933
  • Grade: MS 69
  • Year: 1976

1976, Austria. Gold 1000 Schilling Babenberg Dynasty Coin. Top Pop! PCGS MS69

Austria Silver Proof 500 Schilling Coin 1980 Km#2947 Steyr Pcgs Pr67 Top Pop

Austria_Silver_Proof_500_Schilling_Coin_1980_Km_2947_Steyr_Pcgs_Pr67_Top_Pop_01_kszn Austria Silver Proof 500 Schilling Coin 1980 Km#2947 Steyr Pcgs Pr67 Top Pop

Austria Silver Proof 500 Schilling Coin 1980 Km#2947 Steyr Pcgs Pr67 Top Pop
AUSTRIA SILVER PROOF 500 SCHILLING COIN 1980 YEAR KM#2947. 1000th Anniversary of Steyr. PCGS GRADING PR67 TOP POP. The item “AUSTRIA SILVER PROOF 500 SCHILLING COIN 1980 KM#2947 STEYR PCGS PR67 TOP POP” is in sale since Tuesday, October 5, 2021. This item is in the category “Coins & Paper Money\Coins\ World\Europe\Austria”. The seller is “alexandercoins” and is located in Hadera. This item can be shipped worldwide.
  • Country/Region of Manufacture: Austria
  • Certification Number: 42390600
  • Certification: PCGS
  • Grade: PR 67
  • Year: 1980
  • Circulated/Uncirculated: Uncirculated
  • Composition: Silver
  • Denomination: 500 Schilling
  • KM Number: 2947

Austria Silver Proof 500 Schilling Coin 1980 Km#2947 Steyr Pcgs Pr67 Top Pop

1899, Austria, Emperor Francis Joseph I. Gold Ducat Coin. Top Pop! PCGS MS-65(+)

1899_Austria_Emperor_Francis_Joseph_I_Gold_Ducat_Coin_Top_Pop_PCGS_MS_65_01_jtb 1899, Austria, Emperor Francis Joseph I. Gold Ducat Coin. Top Pop! PCGS MS-65(+)
1899, Austria, Emperor Francis Joseph I. Gold Ducat Coin. Top Pop! PCGS MS-65(+)
1899, Austria, Emperor Francis Joseph I. Gold Ducat Coin. Top Pop! PCGS MS-65(+)
1899, Austria, Emperor Francis Joseph I. Gold Ducat Coin. Top Pop! PCGS MS-65(+)

1899, Austria, Emperor Francis Joseph I. Gold Ducat Coin. Top Pop! PCGS MS-65(+)
1899, Austria, Emperor Francis Joseph I. Mint Year: 1899 Mint Place: Vienna (A) Denomination: Gold Ducat Reference: Friedberg 1233, KM-2267. Certified and graded by PCGS as MS-65(+). 986 Diameter: 21mm Weight: 3.49gm. Obverse: Wreathed head of Franz Josef I right. AVSTRIAE IMPERATOR / A. Reverse: Imperial double headed eagle with shield with coat of arms at chest, holding sword, imperial scepter and orb. The last significant Habsburg monarch. Franz Josef was the eldest son of Archduke Franz Karl (Francis Charles), who was brother and heir of Austrian Emperor Ferdinand I. Because his father renounced his right to the throne, Franz Josef became emperor when Ferdinand abdicated near the end of the revolution of 1848. By the time Franz Josef stepped onto the throne, Austria’s position as a European “great power” was already in serious decline. Three external factors furthered Austria’s decline. Lingering Russian ill will was a factor in the July (1914) Crisis which led to the outbreak of WWI. – The unification of Italy provided a new threat to the empire. In the decade that followed, Austria lost nearly all of its Italian possessions, such as Lombardy and Venetia. – The rise of Prussian dominance of the German Confederation, and Austria’s loss of the Austro-Prussian war in 1866. German unification in 1871 made Austria the lesser of the two German powers. Austria was weakened by these reverses. Franz Josef had little choice but to negotiate with Hungary on its demands for autonomy. Austria and Hungary agreed to create a dual monarchy in which the two countries would be equal partners. Under the empire of Austria-Hungary, as it was known after 1867, Hungary had complete independence in internal affairs, but the two countries acted jointly in foreign affairs. (This fact contributed to the slowness of A-H’s response to the murder of Franz Ferdinand). The same year, Franz Josef and Elizabeth were formally crowned king and queen of Hungary. Franz Josef married Elizabeth, daughter of Duke Maximilian of Bavaria, in 1854. They had one son, Rudolf, and three daughters. As the dual monarch, Franz Josef planned to grant some form of self-government to the Austrian Slavs, but the German and Magyar elites who actually controlled the empire opposed any sharing of power. The resulting dissatisfaction among Austrian Czechs and Serbs further weakened the Habsburg realms and caused increased friction with Russia, which championed the cause of Europe’s Slavic peoples. Franz Josef’s later years were marked by a series of tragedies in his family. In 1894 his only son and heir to the throne, Archduke Rudolf, committed suicide; Franz Josef’s second younger brother, Karl Ludwig, had died in 1896 from illness due to bad water he drank while on a holy lands pilgrimage; in 1898 Elizabeth was assassinated by an Italian anarchist. Succession to the Austrian throne was not simple. Following the suicide of Franz Josef’s only son Rudolf, the next in succession would have been Franz Josef’s younger brother Maximillian. Maximillian, however, had been executed by a firing squad in Mexico in 1867 after a 3 year reign as Emperor of Mexico. Karl Ludwig’s oldest son, Franz Ferdinand replaced Rudolf as heir to the throne. Franz Ferdinand was assassinated by a Serbian nationalist in Sarajevo in June 1914. The assasination precipitated a crisis which led to the outbreak of World War I. Franz Josef died on November 21, 1916. He did not live to see Austria’s defeat in the war. His grand nephew, Karl I assumed the throne for two years, but was the last Habsburg monarch. William served in the army from 1814 onward, fought against Napoleon I of France during the Napoleonic Wars, and was reportedly a very brave soldier. He fought under Blücher at the Battles of Waterloo and Ligny. He also became an excellent diplomat by engaging in diplomatic missions after 1815. During the Revolutions of 1848, William successfully crushed a revolt that was aimed at his elder brother King Frederick William IV. The use of cannons made him unpopular at the time and earned him the nickname. In 1857 Frederick William IV suffered a stroke and became mentally disabled for the rest of his life. In January 1858 William became Prince Regent for his brother. On January 2, 1890 Frederick William died and William ascended the throne as William I of Prussia. He inherited a conflict between Frederick William and the liberal parliament. He was considered a politically neutral person as he intervened less in politics than his brother. William nevertheless found a conservative solution for the conflict: he appointed Otto von Bismarck to the office of Prime Minister. According to the Prussian constitution, the Prime Minister was responsible solely to the king, not to parliament. Bismarck liked to see his work relationship with William as that of a vassal to his feudal superior. Nonetheless it was Bismarck who effectively directed the politics, interior as well as foreign; on several occasions he gained William’s assent by threatening to resign. In the aftermath of the Franco-Prussian War William was proclaimed German Emperor on January 18, 1871 in Versailles Palace. The title “German Emperor” was carefully chosen by Bismarck after discussion until (and after) the day of the proclamation. William accepted this title grudgingly as he would have preferred “Emperor of Germany” which, however, was unacceptable to the federated monarchs, and would also have signalled a claim to lands outside of his reign Austria, Switzerland, Luxemburg etc. The title “Emperor of the Germans”, as proposed in 1848, was ruled out from the start anyway, as he considered himself chosen “by the grace of God”, not by the people as in a democratic republic. This Empire was a federal state; the emperor was head of state and president. First among equals of the federated monarchs (the kings of Bavaria, Württemberg, Saxony, the grand dukes of Baden and Hesse, and so on, not to forget the senates of the free cities of Hamburg, Lübeck and Bremen). On May 11, 1875, Max Hödel failed in an assassination attempt on William in Berlin. A second attempt was made on June 2, 1875, by the anarchist Karl Nobiling, who wounded William before committing suicide. These attempts became the pretext for the institution of the Anti-Socialist Law, which was introduced by Bismarck’s government with the support of a majority in the Reichstag in October 18, 1875, for the purpose of fighting the. The laws deprived the Social Democratic Party of Germany of its legal status; they prohibited all organizations, workers’ mass organizations and the socialist and workers’ press, decreed confiscation of socialist literature, and subjected Social-Democrats to reprisals. The laws were extended every 2-3 years. Despite this policy of reprisals the Social Democratic Party increased its influence among the masses. Under pressure of the mass working-class movement the laws were repealed on October 1, 1890. In his memoirs, Bismarck describes William as an old-fashioned, courteous, infallibly polite gentleman and a genuine Prussian officer, whose good common sense was occasionally undermined by “female influences”. The item “1899, Austria, Emperor Francis Joseph I. Gold Ducat Coin. Top Pop! PCGS MS-65(+)” is in sale since Monday, April 19, 2021. This item is in the category “Coins & Paper Money\Coins\ World\Europe\Austria”. The seller is “coinworldtv” and is located in Wien. This item can be shipped worldwide.
  • Composition: Gold
  • Country/Region of Manufacture: Austria
  • Certification: PCGS
  • Denomination: Ducat
  • KM Number: 2267
  • Grade: MS 65
  • Year: 1899

1899, Austria, Emperor Francis Joseph I. Gold Ducat Coin. Top Pop! PCGS MS-65(+)

1846, Austria, Emperor Ferdinand I. Gold Ducat Coin. (3.5gm) Top Pop! PCGS MS64

1846_Austria_Emperor_Ferdinand_I_Gold_Ducat_Coin_3_5gm_Top_Pop_PCGS_MS64_01_bqio 1846, Austria, Emperor Ferdinand I. Gold Ducat Coin. (3.5gm) Top Pop! PCGS MS64
1846, Austria, Emperor Ferdinand I. Gold Ducat Coin. (3.5gm) Top Pop! PCGS MS64
1846, Austria, Emperor Ferdinand I. Gold Ducat Coin. (3.5gm) Top Pop! PCGS MS64
1846, Austria, Emperor Ferdinand I. Gold Ducat Coin. (3.5gm) Top Pop! PCGS MS64

1846, Austria, Emperor Ferdinand I. Gold Ducat Coin. (3.5gm) Top Pop! PCGS MS64
1846, Austria, Emperor Ferdinand I. (3.5gm) Top Pop! Mint Year: 1846 Mint Place: Vienna (A) Denomination: Gold Ducat Reference: Friedberg 481, KM-2262. Certified and graded by PCGS as MS-64! None higher, and definitely remarkable! 986 Diameter: 20mm Weight: 3.5gm. Obverse : Laureate head of Ferdinand right. Mint initial (A) of Vienna below. / A Reverse : Imperial double headed weagle with coat of arms at chest and crown above. Ferdinand I, Emperor of Austria, King of Hungary and Bohemia (April 19, 1793 June 29, 1875) succeeded his father (Franz II Holy Roman Emperor/Franz I of Austria) as emperor and king (as Ferdinand V) in 1835. He chose to abdicate, after a series of revolts in 1848. He was also King of Lombardy-Venetia. Ferdinand has been depicted as feeble-minded and incapable of ruling, but although he was epileptic and certainly not intelligent, he kept a coherent and legible diary and has even been said to have a sharp wit. The up to twenty seizures he had per day, though, severely restricted his ability to rule with any effectiveness. Though he was not declared incapacitated, a regent’s council (Archduke Luis, Count Kolowrat and Prince Metternich) steered the government. He is famous for his one coherent command: when his cook told him he could not have apricot dumplings because they were out of season, he said I’m the Emperor, and I want dumplings! Ich bin der Kaiser und ich will Knödel. As the revolutionaries of 1848 were marching on the palace, he is supposed to have asked Metternich for an explanation. When Metternich answered that they were making a revolution, Ferdinand is supposed to have said But are they allowed to do that? Ja, dürfen’s denn des? He was convinced by Felix zu Schwarzenberg to abdicate in favour of his nephew, Franz Joseph (the next in line was Ferdinand’s younger brother Franz Karl, but he was persuaded to waive his succession rights in favour of his son) who would occupy the Austrian throne for the next sixty-eight years. Ferdinand recorded the events in his diary : The affair ended with the new Emperor kneeling before his old Emperor and Lord, that is to say, me, and asking for a blessing, which I gave him, laying both hands on his head and making the sign of the Holy Cross… Then I embraced him and kissed our new master, and then we went to our room. Afterward I and my dear wife heard Holy Mass… After that I and my dear wife packed our bags. Ferdinand was the last King of Bohemia to be crowned as such. Due to his sympathy with Bohemia (where he spent the rest of his life in Prague Castle) he was given the Czech nickname “Ferdinand V, the Good”. In Austria, Ferdinand was similarly nicknamed “Ferdinand der Gütige” (Ferdinand the Benign), but also ridiculed as “Gütinand der Fertige” (Goodinand the Finished). He is interred in tomb number 62 in the Imperial Crypt in Vienna. The item “1846, Austria, Emperor Ferdinand I. Gold Ducat Coin. (3.5gm) Top Pop! PCGS MS64″ is in sale since Thursday, March 25, 2021. This item is in the category “Coins & Paper Money\Coins\ World\Europe\Austria”. The seller is “coinworldtv” and is located in Wien. This item can be shipped worldwide.
  • Composition: Gold
  • Country/Region of Manufacture: Austria
  • Certification: PCGS
  • Denomination: Ducat
  • KM Number: 2262
  • Grade: MS 64
  • Year: 1846

1846, Austria, Emperor Ferdinand I. Gold Ducat Coin. (3.5gm) Top Pop! PCGS MS64

1892, Austria, Emperor Francis Joseph I. Gold Ducat Coin. Top Pop! PCGS MS-64

1892_Austria_Emperor_Francis_Joseph_I_Gold_Ducat_Coin_Top_Pop_PCGS_MS_64_01_wi 1892, Austria, Emperor Francis Joseph I. Gold Ducat Coin. Top Pop! PCGS MS-64
1892, Austria, Emperor Francis Joseph I. Gold Ducat Coin. Top Pop! PCGS MS-64
1892, Austria, Emperor Francis Joseph I. Gold Ducat Coin. Top Pop! PCGS MS-64
1892, Austria, Emperor Francis Joseph I. Gold Ducat Coin. Top Pop! PCGS MS-64

1892, Austria, Emperor Francis Joseph I. Gold Ducat Coin. Top Pop! PCGS MS-64
1892, Austria, Emperor Francis Joseph I. Mint Year: 1892 Denomination: Ducat Mint Place: Vienna (A) Reference: Friedberg 1233, KM-2267. Certified and graded by PCGS as MS-64! 986 Diameter: 21mm Weight: 3.49gm. Obverse: Wreathed head of Franz Josef I right. AVSTRIAE IMPERATOR / A. Reverse: Imperial double headed eagle with shield with coat of arms at chest, holding sword, imperial scepter and orb. The last significant Habsburg monarch. Franz Josef was the eldest son of Archduke Franz Karl (Francis Charles), who was brother and heir of Austrian Emperor Ferdinand I. Because his father renounced his right to the throne, Franz Josef became emperor when Ferdinand abdicated near the end of the revolution of 1848. By the time Franz Josef stepped onto the throne, Austria’s position as a European “great power” was already in serious decline. Three external factors furthered Austria’s decline. Lingering Russian ill will was a factor in the July (1914) Crisis which led to the outbreak of WWI. – The unification of Italy provided a new threat to the empire. In the decade that followed, Austria lost nearly all of its Italian possessions, such as Lombardy and Venetia. – The rise of Prussian dominance of the German Confederation, and Austria’s loss of the Austro-Prussian war in 1866. German unification in 1871 made Austria the lesser of the two German powers. Austria was weakened by these reverses. Franz Josef had little choice but to negotiate with Hungary on its demands for autonomy. Austria and Hungary agreed to create a dual monarchy in which the two countries would be equal partners. Under the empire of Austria-Hungary, as it was known after 1867, Hungary had complete independence in internal affairs, but the two countries acted jointly in foreign affairs. (This fact contributed to the slowness of A-H’s response to the murder of Franz Ferdinand). The same year, Franz Josef and Elizabeth were formally crowned king and queen of Hungary. Franz Josef married Elizabeth, daughter of Duke Maximilian of Bavaria, in 1854. They had one son, Rudolf, and three daughters. As the dual monarch, Franz Josef planned to grant some form of self-government to the Austrian Slavs, but the German and Magyar elites who actually controlled the empire opposed any sharing of power. The resulting dissatisfaction among Austrian Czechs and Serbs further weakened the Habsburg realms and caused increased friction with Russia, which championed the cause of Europe’s Slavic peoples. Franz Josef’s later years were marked by a series of tragedies in his family. In 1894 his only son and heir to the throne, Archduke Rudolf, committed suicide; Franz Josef’s second younger brother, Karl Ludwig, had died in 1896 from illness due to bad water he drank while on a holy lands pilgrimage; in 1898 Elizabeth was assassinated by an Italian anarchist. Succession to the Austrian throne was not simple. Following the suicide of Franz Josef’s only son Rudolf, the next in succession would have been Franz Josef’s younger brother Maximillian. Maximillian, however, had been executed by a firing squad in Mexico in 1867 after a 3 year reign as Emperor of Mexico. Karl Ludwig’s oldest son, Franz Ferdinand replaced Rudolf as heir to the throne. Franz Ferdinand was assassinated by a Serbian nationalist in Sarajevo in June 1914. The assasination precipitated a crisis which led to the outbreak of World War I. Franz Josef died on November 21, 1916. He did not live to see Austria’s defeat in the war. His grand nephew, Karl I assumed the throne for two years, but was the last Habsburg monarch. William served in the army from 1814 onward, fought against Napoleon I of France during the Napoleonic Wars, and was reportedly a very brave soldier. He fought under Blücher at the Battles of Waterloo and Ligny. He also became an excellent diplomat by engaging in diplomatic missions after 1815. During the Revolutions of 1848, William successfully crushed a revolt that was aimed at his elder brother King Frederick William IV. The use of cannons made him unpopular at the time and earned him the nickname. In 1857 Frederick William IV suffered a stroke and became mentally disabled for the rest of his life. In January 1858 William became Prince Regent for his brother. On January 2, 1890 Frederick William died and William ascended the throne as William I of Prussia. He inherited a conflict between Frederick William and the liberal parliament. He was considered a politically neutral person as he intervened less in politics than his brother. William nevertheless found a conservative solution for the conflict: he appointed Otto von Bismarck to the office of Prime Minister. According to the Prussian constitution, the Prime Minister was responsible solely to the king, not to parliament. Bismarck liked to see his work relationship with William as that of a vassal to his feudal superior. Nonetheless it was Bismarck who effectively directed the politics, interior as well as foreign; on several occasions he gained William’s assent by threatening to resign. In the aftermath of the Franco-Prussian War William was proclaimed German Emperor on January 18, 1871 in Versailles Palace. The title “German Emperor” was carefully chosen by Bismarck after discussion until (and after) the day of the proclamation. William accepted this title grudgingly as he would have preferred “Emperor of Germany” which, however, was unacceptable to the federated monarchs, and would also have signalled a claim to lands outside of his reign Austria, Switzerland, Luxemburg etc. The title “Emperor of the Germans”, as proposed in 1848, was ruled out from the start anyway, as he considered himself chosen “by the grace of God”, not by the people as in a democratic republic. This Empire was a federal state; the emperor was head of state and president. First among equals of the federated monarchs (the kings of Bavaria, Württemberg, Saxony, the grand dukes of Baden and Hesse, and so on, not to forget the senates of the free cities of Hamburg, Lübeck and Bremen). On May 11, 1875, Max Hödel failed in an assassination attempt on William in Berlin. A second attempt was made on June 2, 1875, by the anarchist Karl Nobiling, who wounded William before committing suicide. These attempts became the pretext for the institution of the Anti-Socialist Law, which was introduced by Bismarck’s government with the support of a majority in the Reichstag in October 18, 1875, for the purpose of fighting the. The laws deprived the Social Democratic Party of Germany of its legal status; they prohibited all organizations, workers’ mass organizations and the socialist and workers’ press, decreed confiscation of socialist literature, and subjected Social-Democrats to reprisals. The laws were extended every 2-3 years. Despite this policy of reprisals the Social Democratic Party increased its influence among the masses. Under pressure of the mass working-class movement the laws were repealed on October 1, 1890. In his memoirs, Bismarck describes William as an old-fashioned, courteous, infallibly polite gentleman and a genuine Prussian officer, whose good common sense was occasionally undermined by “female influences”. The item “1892, Austria, Emperor Francis Joseph I. Gold Ducat Coin. Top Pop! PCGS MS-64″ is in sale since Thursday, March 25, 2021. This item is in the category “Coins & Paper Money\Coins\ World\Europe\Austria”. The seller is “coinworldtv” and is located in Wien. This item can be shipped worldwide.
  • Composition: Gold
  • Country/Region of Manufacture: Austria
  • Certification: PCGS
  • Denomination: Ducat
  • KM Number: 2267
  • Grade: MS 64
  • Year: 1892

1892, Austria, Emperor Francis Joseph I. Gold Ducat Coin. Top Pop! PCGS MS-64

AUSTRIA 1967 50 SHILLINGS PCGS MS 67 SILVER Monster Toned Top Pop

AUSTRIA_1967_50_SHILLINGS_PCGS_MS_67_SILVER_Monster_Toned_Top_Pop_01_afdm AUSTRIA 1967 50 SHILLINGS PCGS MS 67 SILVER Monster Toned Top Pop
AUSTRIA 1967 50 SHILLINGS PCGS MS 67 SILVER Monster Toned Top Pop
AUSTRIA 1967 50 SHILLINGS PCGS MS 67 SILVER Monster Toned Top Pop

AUSTRIA 1967 50 SHILLINGS PCGS MS 67 SILVER Monster Toned Top Pop
AUSTRIA 1969 50 SHILLINGS – PCGS MS 67 – SILVER – Monster Toned. The item “AUSTRIA 1967 50 SHILLINGS PCGS MS 67 SILVER Monster Toned Top Pop” is in sale since Monday, June 22, 2020. This item is in the category “Coins & Paper Money\Coins\ World\Europe\Austria”. The seller is “theccgshop” and is located in Skokie, Illinois. This item can be shipped to United States, Canada, United Kingdom, Denmark, Romania, Slovakia, Bulgaria, Czech republic, Finland, Hungary, Latvia, Lithuania, Malta, Estonia, Australia, Greece, Portugal, Cyprus, Slovenia, Japan, China, Sweden, South Korea, Indonesia, Taiwan, South africa, Thailand, Belgium, France, Hong Kong, Ireland, Netherlands, Poland, Spain, Italy, Germany, Austria, Bahamas, Israel, Mexico, New Zealand, Philippines, Singapore, Switzerland, Norway, Saudi arabia, Ukraine, United arab emirates, Qatar, Kuwait, Bahrain, Croatia, Malaysia, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Antigua and barbuda, Aruba, Belize, Dominica, Grenada, Saint kitts and nevis, Saint lucia, Montserrat, Turks and caicos islands, Barbados, Bangladesh, Bermuda, Brunei darussalam, Bolivia, Ecuador, Egypt, French guiana, Guernsey, Gibraltar, Guadeloupe, Iceland, Jersey, Jordan, Cambodia, Cayman islands, Liechtenstein, Sri lanka, Luxembourg, Monaco, Macao, Martinique, Maldives, Nicaragua, Oman, Peru, Pakistan, Paraguay, Reunion, Viet nam, Uruguay.
  • Year: 1967
  • Grade: MS 67
  • Country/Region of Manufacture: Austria
  • Circulated/Uncirculated: Uncirculated
  • Certification: PCGS
  • Composition: Silver

AUSTRIA 1967 50 SHILLINGS PCGS MS 67 SILVER Monster Toned Top Pop

Austria 1969 50 Schilling Maximilian I Pcgs Gradedms69top Pop World Coin

Austria_1969_50_Schilling_Maximilian_I_Pcgs_Gradedms69top_Pop_World_Coin_01_wp Austria 1969 50 Schilling Maximilian I Pcgs Gradedms69top Pop World Coin
Austria 1969 50 Schilling Maximilian I Pcgs Gradedms69top Pop World Coin
Austria 1969 50 Schilling Maximilian I Pcgs Gradedms69top Pop World Coin

Austria 1969 50 Schilling Maximilian I Pcgs Gradedms69top Pop World Coin
AUSTRIA 1969 50 SCHILLING MAXIMILIAN I PCGS GRADEDMS69TOP POP WORLD COIN. ADDED COST PER COIN. CHECK THE PHOTOSASK QUESTIONS. PICTURES TAKE PRECEDENCE OVER WRITTEN MISTAKES IN LISTING WHAT YOU SEE IS WHAT YOU WILL RECEIVE! WILL BE AUTOMATICALLY BLOCKED. Auctiva offers Free Image Hosting and Editing. Auctiva gets you noticed! The item “AUSTRIA 1969 50 SCHILLING MAXIMILIAN I PCGS GRADEDMS69TOP POP WORLD COIN” is in sale since Tuesday, December 29, 2020. This item is in the category “Coins & Paper Money\Coins\ World\Europe\Austria”. The seller is “welike2buyandsell” and is located in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. This item can be shipped worldwide.
  • Denomination: 50 Schilling
  • Certification: PCGS

Austria 1969 50 Schilling Maximilian I Pcgs Gradedms69top Pop World Coin

AUSTRIA 1967 50 SHILLINGS PCGS MS 68 SILVER Monster Toned Top Pop

AUSTRIA_1967_50_SHILLINGS_PCGS_MS_68_SILVER_Monster_Toned_Top_Pop_01_lea AUSTRIA 1967 50 SHILLINGS PCGS MS 68 SILVER Monster Toned Top Pop
AUSTRIA 1967 50 SHILLINGS PCGS MS 68 SILVER Monster Toned Top Pop
AUSTRIA 1967 50 SHILLINGS PCGS MS 68 SILVER Monster Toned Top Pop

AUSTRIA 1967 50 SHILLINGS PCGS MS 68 SILVER Monster Toned Top Pop
AUSTRIA 1969 50 SHILLINGS – PCGS MS 67 – SILVER – Monster Toned. The item “AUSTRIA 1967 50 SHILLINGS PCGS MS 68 SILVER Monster Toned Top Pop” is in sale since Monday, June 22, 2020. This item is in the category “Coins & Paper Money\Coins\ World\Europe\Austria”. The seller is “theccgshop” and is located in Skokie, Illinois. This item can be shipped to United States, Canada, United Kingdom, Denmark, Romania, Slovakia, Bulgaria, Czech republic, Finland, Hungary, Latvia, Lithuania, Malta, Estonia, Australia, Greece, Portugal, Cyprus, Slovenia, Japan, China, Sweden, South Korea, Indonesia, Taiwan, South africa, Thailand, Belgium, France, Hong Kong, Ireland, Netherlands, Poland, Spain, Italy, Germany, Austria, Bahamas, Israel, Mexico, New Zealand, Philippines, Singapore, Switzerland, Norway, Saudi arabia, Ukraine, United arab emirates, Qatar, Kuwait, Bahrain, Croatia, Malaysia, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Antigua and barbuda, Aruba, Belize, Dominica, Grenada, Saint kitts and nevis, Saint lucia, Montserrat, Turks and caicos islands, Barbados, Bangladesh, Bermuda, Brunei darussalam, Bolivia, Ecuador, Egypt, French guiana, Guernsey, Gibraltar, Guadeloupe, Iceland, Jersey, Jordan, Cambodia, Cayman islands, Liechtenstein, Sri lanka, Luxembourg, Monaco, Macao, Martinique, Maldives, Nicaragua, Oman, Peru, Pakistan, Paraguay, Reunion, Viet nam, Uruguay.
  • Year: 1967
  • Grade: MS 68
  • Country/Region of Manufacture: Austria
  • Circulated/Uncirculated: Uncirculated
  • Certification: PCGS
  • Composition: Silver

AUSTRIA 1967 50 SHILLINGS PCGS MS 68 SILVER Monster Toned Top Pop